New Titles From Creston Books.

katecvrA biography of a little-known but ground-breaking figure who became the first Detective for the Pinkerton Agency.

Written by award-winning author MARISSA MOSS, with illustrations by award-winning illustrator APRIL CHU.

Perfect for readers aged 5 and up.

 

 

The long awaited sequel to the fun-filled CASE OF THE MISSING CARROT CAKE finds Mouse Detectives Willcox and Griswold on another case involving a stolen egg.

The easy mystery with plenty of clues and lively illustrations is perfect for readers aged 6-9.         poachedeggcvr

THE CASE OF THE POACHED EGG – by Author Robin Newman and Illustrator Deborah Zemke  will have young detectives clamoring for more.

 

 

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RUMORS by Denys Cazet, is full of high humor, great fun, and zany antics that are perfect for reluctant readers aged 8-12.

When forth grader Russel makes a deal with the principal to get back her Wrestling trophy, he is sure his name will be removed from the “bad Behavior” list.  He has a plan.  What could possibly go wrong?

To learn more about these great new titles, visit CRESTON BOOKS: http://www.crestonbooks.co/books

 

 

Ever See a Crab in the Forest?

  NATURE MAKES US NICER.

A study done by the U. of Rochester, 370 people were shown either images of man-made or natural objects and worked in space with or without indoor plants. Images of nature and indoor plants made people feel more connected, more caring and charitable toward others. Man-made images made people place more value on wealth and fame. Other research tells us that exposure to nature reduces stress.
So, if you’re looking for a gift that keeps on giving, try plants and photos of natural settings to help you through the dreary days of winter. Visit parks and natural areas as often as you can.
To view beautiful photos of nature click on Travel + Nature at:   http://www.treehugger.com
Spring is just around the corner!

To get children interested in nature, take them            

Boston Arboretum

Boston Arboretum

outdoors. It doesn’t have to be a park or forest. A playground, back yard or grassy field will do nicely. Get down on your knees and look for things hiding in the grass and under leaves and rocks. Most children have a natural curiosity when it comes to bugs, birds, and wild creatures. If you’re a bit squeamish regarding members of the insect population, try not to project those feelings onto your child.  Most bugs and insects are harmless and fascinating to watch as they go about their business. A magnifying glass will add a level of “scientific authority” to the activity. It’s also fun to take along a camera or some paper and pencil to record what you discover. Have a contest for whoever can find the most different species.

Buds are springing up from the ground and on trees thanks to our mild winter.  How many can you and your child identify?  There are lots of field guides available to help you identify plants and insects.                             Triple oaks spiderWhat are some of your favorite natural spaces?

Remember: “Take only photos, leave only footprints

AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT: A Chat with Annie Silvestro in Celebration of the Release of her Debut Picture Book BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB!

Laura Sassi Tales

bunnys-book-club-cover

Today I’m delighted to have children’s author, Annie Silvestro, as my guest. Annie and I met several years ago at the NJSCBWI annual conference and I’ve enjoyed following her (and cheering her on) in her writing journey.  Her debut picture book BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB, illustrated by Tatjana Mai-Wyss and published by Doubleday Books for Young Readers, releases this month. The story of a book-loving bunny who sneaks into the town library and borrows books for all his forest friends, KIRKUS REVIEWS hails BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB as a “sweet salute to reading” . And in its review, PUBLISHERS’ WEEKLY states that Annie “makes the pleasures of reading abundantly clear.”  What’s abundantly clear to me is that Annie has a gift for charming storytelling. Welcome, Annie and let’s get started.

Your love of language is evident in BUNNY’S BOOK CLUB. How was that love developed?

Thank you for saying that! I have always been a reader and my love of language…

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Shake Off the Winter Blahs.

 I recently visited the Art Museum on the Princeton University campus. It was great for three reasons. First of all, it’s free. There aren’t many places of culture and enlightenment nowadays that can boast that. And, the collection has something for everyone.  There are sculptures and pottery over 4,000 years old, paintings done by ANDY WARHOL, and everything in between.

The third reason it was a great visit is because where else but an art museum provides peace, quiet, and contemplation along with some magnificent objects of beauty? Being in such an environment frees the mind and allows all sorts of creative energy to enter. Writers who are struggling with writer’s block might find inspiration looking at any painting or sculpture, and stories begin to spring into mind. WHY did the artist choose such a subject? WHAT IF the subject were alive today? WHAT would she/he have to say?  The possibilities for story are endless.

Let the kids go on a SCAVENGER HUNT, searching for specific art pieces throughout the day.  Many museums have programs geared specifically for children.

So, if you feel as if you’re in a rut and need some CHANGE to jump start the muse, visit the Princeton University Art Museum – or ANY art museum and let your imagination run wild. Take notes, snap photos and just doodle in a notebook. You never know, it may be the start of something wonderful. artmuseum.princeton.edu

Didn’t someone say “a picture is worth a thousand words?”

Why are Picture Books in Prison? 2.7 Million Reasons…

This is a worthwhile project and a way to pass on some great children’s books your own family may have outgrown.

Michelle Eastman Books

prison

The number of kids with incarcerated parents has increased nearly 80% in the last 20 years, according to data from the Bureau of Justice Statistics. More than 2.7 million children have a parent who is incarcerated, and parents of another 10 million children have been incarcerated at some point.  The experience can be profoundly difficult for children, increasing their risk of living in poverty and housing instability, as well as causing emotional trauma, pain, and social stigma.http://www.americanlibrariesmagazine.org/article/reading-inside

But, through programs like the Visiting Nurse Services of Iowa Storybook Project, some of that stress melts away when kids and parents are able to share a special book together. Through an audio-tape reading program wherein imprisoned parents/grandparents read books to their children/grandchildren on tape, family bonds are strengthened and literacy skills improve as parents encourage their children to read with them and in their absence. Read this touching NY Times…

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VALENTINE TREATS

February Recipe: Sweetheart Pretzel Sticks

To celebrate Valentine’s Day and share a homemade treat with loved ones, your children can make these easy, delicious, chocolate treats.

Ingredients:   I bag of pretzel rods, chocolate morsels, chopped nuts, sprinkles, coconut or whatever toppings you prefer, waxed paper.

Note: (An adult needs to be on hand to monitor use of the microwave for melting the chocolate morsels.)

  1. Place morsels in a microwave-safe dish. Cook on high for 1-2 minutes. Remove and stir. If morsels need more melting, return them the microwave for 30 second intervals until they are melted.
  2. Dip one end of the pretzel rod into the melted chocolate until about 1/3 of it is covered. Place on the waxed paper covered cookie sheet.
  3. Then sprinkle your topping onto the chocolate covered section.
  4. Allow them to harden before wrapping into plastic bags to give as gifts. (For a quicker set time: Pop the logs into the refrigerator for an hour.)

FYI: Not only does chocolate taste great, it actually is good for us. Swiss researchers have found that the polyphenols in dark chocolate curb the body’s output of stress hormones. This helps prevent high blood pressure, racing heart rate, and shallow breathing that can lead to anxiety. Regular consumption of cocoa can also improve physical endurance by 50% due to compounds in it that encourage cell’s ability to convert glucose to energy. Dark chocolate IN SMALL QUANTITIES works best.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY!