How to “BEE” Kind to Bees.

For thousands of years, honeybees have transformed flower nectar into that wonderful sweetness called honey.  Not only is honey a delicious treat in recipes or to sweeten a cup of tea, it has many medicinal properties as well.  Due to its sterile qualities, doctors used it as wound dressings during the civil war.

Honeybees are important in another crucial way – as pollinators of our food supply.  The USDA estimates that “about one mouthful in three in our diet directly or indirectly benefits from honeybee pollination”.  Some crops, such as almonds, rely completely upon honeybees for propagation.

So what, you might ask?  Honeybee populations are dwindling worldwide from a combination of factors that contribute to Colony Collapse Disorder. This happens when worker bees leave behind a colony with only a queen and a few immature bees, resulting in death of the colony. Currently the main factors are thought to be: viruses, parasites, management stressors, migratory stress and pesticides.  To view a film on CCD: http://www.vanishingbees.com

Honeybees are one of many indicators of a healthy environment.  A disturbance in their life cycle, could be a symptom of larger issues.           

HOW CAN WE HELP?

  1. Buy organic to help reduce pesticide use.  Refrain from use of pesticides in your own yard and garden.
  2. Plant pollinator-friendly plants such as bee balm and red clover.
  3. Buy local and single producer honey to support small scale bee keepers in your own community.
  4. Enjoy the wonderful taste of local honey in your own recipes.

BEE KIND TO BEES…Our Food Supply Depends on it!

 

Book Giveaway: RENATO AND THE LION

Writing and Illustrating

Author/Illustrator Barbara DiLorenzo has agreed to give away a copy of her first picture book that she wrote and illustrated, RENATO AND THE LION. If you would like to win a copy, please leave a comment, reblog, tweet, or talk about A BAND OF BABIES on Facebook with a link and you will get additional chances to win. Just let me know the other things you did to share the good news, so I can put the right amount of tickets in my basket for you. Check back to discover the winner.

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

The touching, magical story of a boy in a war-torn country and the stone lion that rescues him.

Renato loves his home in Florence, Italy. He loves playing with his friends in the Piazza della Signoria. He loves walking home by the beautiful buildings and fountains with his father in the evenings. And he especially loves…

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Under the Radar: Low Profile National Parks Part 1, by Marilyn Ostermiller

More Americans than ever plan to vacation with their families this summer, according to a recent AAA survey. Many of them are going to America’s national parks. The Great Smoky Mountains expect about 10 million visitors this year, compared to five million each at the Grand Canyon and Yellowstone.

Looking for a “road less traveled” experience? Five low profile national parks, based on the number of annual visitors, are listed below.

Ultimate Wilderness

 Alaska’s Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve was created to preserve and protect 8.4 million acres of the diverse Arctic ecosystems of Alaska’s Brooks Range. It serves as the headwaters for six wilderness rivers. There are no facilities, roads or trails. Visitors should come equipped to backpack, hike, camp and cruise the rivers. Transportation in and out of the park, usually by plane, must be pre-arranged.

Annual visitors: 10,047

Photo Credit: National Parks Service:  A Student Conservation Association volunteer stands on the Continental Divide in the Brooks Mountain Range, which divides the continent north and south.

Sunken Ships: Isle Royale National Park is a remote island in Lake Superior near Michigan’s border with Canada. Cars aren’t allowed in this wilderness of forests, lakes and waterways where moose and wolves roam. There are dive sites where visitors plunge into the lake to explore several shipwrecks. Ferry is the only way to get there and camping reservations are required for visitors who want to spend the night.

Annual visitors: 18,684

Water, Water Everywhere, But Not a Drop to Drink:  Dry Tortugas National Park is a cluster of seven islands 70 miles west of Key West, Florida. The “Dry” in its name came from the Spanish explorers who determined the sea water surrounding the islands was not fit to drink. “Tortugas” is the Spanish word for the sea turtles that build their nests in the protected sandy shores.  The waters around the islands particularly appeal to snorkelers because their coral reefs teem with interesting marine life.

Annual visitors: 70,862

South of the Equator:  National Park of American Samoa, Territory of American Samoa, is 2,600 miles southwest of Hawaii. It is America’s only national park south of the equator. Rain forests and extensive coral reefs are its main draw. Visitors should pack snorkel or diving gear; air tanks can be rented. The only land mammals are three types of bats, among them the fruit bats with three-foot  wingspans.

Annual visitors: 13,892

Newest National Park:  Pinnacles National Park in California was designated the 59th national park in 2013. It dates back millions of years ago, when multiple volcanoes erupted, flowed, and slid to form the land encompassed by this 26,000-acre park. Rock climbers and hikers are drawn to it. Another attraction are the condors. About 30 of them are tagged, but fly freely.

Annual Visitors: 206,533

A sequel to this blog post, scheduled for July 10, will acquaint readers with five more of the less-traveled parks around the country. The U.S. National Parks Service provides extensive information about the 59 parks it operates  including trip planning information. https:www.nps.gov

Marilyn Ostermiller is a long-time business journalist who now writes for children. You can follow her on Twitter @Marilyn_Suzanne.

 

 

 

Enjoy Your Own Solar Eclipse Compliments of the US Postal Service.

Mark you calendar: On August 21, a total solar eclipse will be visible from coast to coast in the US.  It will be the first total SOLAR ECLIPSE visible only in the USA since our nation’s founding in 1776.  It will also be the first one to sweep across the ENTIRE country in 99 years.

The eclipse will start on the west coast in OREGON and trace an eastern path 67 miles wide, exiting in SOUTH CAROLINA.  The eclipse will last 2-3 minutes in each location.

If you aren’t able to get out and observe this phenomenon first hand, you can enjoy your own personal SOLAR ECLIPSE thanks to the US Postal Service “Total Eclipse Forever Stamp”.  The stamp – released on Tuesday 6-20-2017 – is a photo of a total solar eclipse taken in Libya on 3-29-2006 by NASA astrophysicist Fred Espenak.  Thanks to the use of THERMOCHROMATIC INK, rubbing the stamp with the heat from your finger or blowing warm air over it, reveals an underlying image of the moon.  The image reverts back to the eclipse once it cools.       

The eclipse is temporary, but the stamp is forever.  How COOL is that?   http://www.usps.com

Starry, Starry Night: Stargazing 101

For a unique and fun-filled family evening, pack up a thermos of your favorite beverage, some cookies or other snacks, flashlights, and a few blankets.  Then head out to an open field or playground where you can view the stars.  The best viewing sites are those where there is little interference from ground lighting.

Kids will enjoy using binoculars as well or a portable telescope if you have one.  Leave electronic devices in the car.  All you really need is your eyes and  a willingness to relax, lie down on the blanket and watch the sky.  Play a game of “connect the stars” to make figures like ancient astronomers did with the constellations.

For serious star gazers, the best spots to view them around the country can be found at http://www.wholeliving.com/starstruck.

No Cook Father’s Day Supper

If You’re looking for something nutritious and delicious that children can prepare for dinner, here is a no-cook salad that is perfect for a hot summer day.  If you make it for Father’s Day, add some make your own sundaes for dessert, and Dad will feel pampered and satisfied.

MIXED GREENS SALAD:  1. Wash and pat dry a mix of salad greens such as romaine, spinach, arugula, radicchio, or any combination you like. Now the tasty fun begins.

Add any or all of the following to make a plain salad a satisfying main dish: sliced cucumbers, olives, shredded carrots, dried cherries or cranberries, sliced strawberries, blueberries, or grapes. Add toasted, slivered almonds or walnuts, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, and grated Parmesan cheese (or any cheese of your choice). If you’re a vegetarian, you can stop here.

The photo version has a packet of salmon on top. I’ve eaten it with shredded chicken or tuna as well. ANY leftover meat works well.

Sprinkle with your favorite dressing – I used a raspberry balsamic with olive oil – and serve with breadsticks or garlic toast and you will get rave reviews.  HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

Marina Cohen Presents: The Doll’s Eye…Perfect Summer-time creepy for the MG Crowd

The Doll’s Eye tells the story of 12 year-old Hadley who, after moving in to a big old house with her new stepfather and stepbrother, finds herself lamenting the loss of her old life. When a lone glass eye rolls out from a dark corner underneath her bed, things begin to change, though not necessarily for the better. A second narrative weaves its way through the novel—that of the first girl who lived in the house and the evil she unwittingly unleashed. It’s a tale of wish fulfillment and consequence, of innocence and happiness. I’m very grateful it’s received some wonderful reviews including School library journal who called it “a must have for horror fans.”

Kirkus review: https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/marina-cohen/the-dolls-eye/

The book’s path to publication:

I wrote The Doll’s Eye before I wrote The Inn Between. It was the manuscript that garnered the attention of my amazing agent and for that I’m so very grateful. I spent nearly a year revising it for him, but when it was finally submitted it didn’t sell. Devastated, I set it aside and wrote The Inn Between. When that sold in a two-book deal, I decided to have one final look at The Doll’s Eye before giving up on it entirely, and wham! It hit me.

I finally knew what was wrong with the story. I tore the entire manuscript apart and rebuilt it word by word. The plot changed dramatically.  I am not only extremely grateful to my editor for loving it, but to those who passed on it because they forced me to write a better book.