Need Good Books For Holiday Gifts? Check Out The KidLit Authors’ Club.

The authors of KidLit Authors’ Club have a variety of books for kids of all ages. Picture books, middle grade, YA, non-fiction and more. Check out the titles and award-winning authors. Give the gift of reading to a child and create a life-long learner.

https://kidlitauthorsclub.com/?fbclid=IwAR2kQFUqDuawWZwfPy-cDHLzcITD46QjVocYQOh2wHHnHMhvYIOclw6N8vg

3 New MG Book Reviews + A Give-Away.

As promised, here is the third post with a book give-away. This one features Three MG books I’ve recently had the pleasure to read and review.

Goodbye, Mr. Spalding

GOODBYE, MR. SPALDING, by Jennifer Robin Barr is a thoughtful and heart-warming middle grade tale of friendship, family and baseball set in Philadelphia in the early 1930’s.

Twelve-year-old Jimmy Frank and his best friend Lola have lived next door to each other since they were babies. Their houses overlook Shibe Park which happens to be the home of the Philadelphia Athletics baseball team. They and their families enjoy cheering on their favorite team from the rooftop bleachers of their 20th Street homes. The small admission fees charged to the folks that fill up the bleacher seats goes a long way toward making ends meet during difficult times. And, every so often an A’s player – like Jimmie Foxx – hits a right field home run right over the fence and onto their rooftop.

At the end of the 1934 season, the neighborhood gets news of a wall that is planned to be built to block their view and make the rooftop bleachers obsolete. This “spite wall” will take away a source of income for the families and erase a beloved tradition. Jimmy sets out to try and stop the wall. With Lola’s help, they try one scheme after another and only succeed in causing trouble for themselves and the community. Will Jimmy’s obsession with the wall ruin his chances of being bat boy for the A’s? Will it ruin his friendship with Lola? Will the Polinski brothers – AKA the neighborhood bullies succeed in ruining Jimmy?  Reader’s will eagerly turn pages to find out.

This delightful story is solidly grounded in the 1930’s with enough local and historical details to fix the depression-era time period. Hopeful, heart-felt and a celebration of teamwork and sportsmanship, it is sure to become a classroom favorite. It knocked me out of the park. Rule # 1934: Goodbye, Mr. Spalding is a home run!

The Joke Machine: Create Your Own Jokes and Become Instantly Funny!

This book is a delight and easy to read.  Comprehensive and user-friendly, THE JOKE MACHINE, by Theresa Julian, is filled with so many ways to create jokes and add humor to writing, including figures of speech such as simile, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and metaphor.  It will jump start imaginations and get kids thinking of ways to add humor and make up jokes of their own.  A definite hit for kids of all ages, and handy for anyone who wants to write funnier.

Something Is Bugging Samantha Hansen

SOMETHING IS BUGGING SAMANTHA HANSEN by Nancy Viau. Ten-year-old Samantha Hansen, the rock loving fourth grader from SAMANTHA HANSEN HAS ROCKS IN HER HEAD is back with a new obsession – insects. The future entomologist thinks science rocks and learning about insects is the best of all.
When Sam discovers that a local apiary – that’s a scientific word for bee farm – is for sale, she is determined to save the honey bees. Will her best friend –who’s maybe not her best friend anymore – and her someday boyfriend Todd help in the cause? Will that annoying kid Richard get in the way?
Reader’s will enjoy Sam’s list of insect facts and her humorous musings about school, friendship, fractions, boys, and how to keep her temper from taking over. It’s a kid-friendly sequel with lots of heart and a perfect addition to STEM and for science loving kids.

I am giving away a copy of SOMETHING IS BUGGING SAMANTHA HANSEN to one lucky reader. To enter, leave a comment and I will put your name in a hat. Share this post and I’ll put your name in twice. One winner will br drawn at random and announced on 11-27-19.

3 New Picture Book Reviews +A Give-away.

This is my second post featuring a book give-away just in time for holiday gifting. Last week I ran a contest for the board book ALL COLORS by Amalia Hoffman.  This week I am featuring three new picture books I’ve recently read and will be giving away one of them to one lucky reader. On Thursday, I will highlight two MG book reviews and a give-away as well. Winners for all the give-aways will be announced on this blog on WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27TH, 2019.

REMARKABLY YOU by Pat Zietlow Miller is a delightful and joyous celebration of all the things that make each of us unique and memorable. I love the positive message painted on every page with words and pictures. A spirited and gentle reminder to be ourselves, no matter what our passions may be, to share our talents, and to spread our sunshine wherever we go. A perfect gift for all ages.

Remarkably You

A ZEBRA PLAYS A ZITHER by Janice Bond is a glorious and beautifully illustrated celebration of the many ways we make music. Shown with a wide variety of animals, this colorful and whimsical picture book makes you want to make music of your own. The illustrations leap off the page as if the animals are dancing to the melodies and instruments they present through the letters of the alphabet. Using alliteration and gentle rhyme, it’s an alphabet book filled with originality. It’s bound to be a favorite for music and animal lovers of all ages.

A Zebra Plays Zither: An Animal Alphabet and Musical Revue

THE SCARECROW by Beth Ferry is a tender and beautifully illustrated story of how kindness is never forgotten and friendship can happen if we open our arms and hearts to the possibility. A perfect book to show children that we all, no matter how small or different, deserve kindness. Makes me want a scarecrow of my own!

The Scarecrow

For a chance to win a copy of A ZEBRA PLAYS A ZITHER, LEAVE A COMMENT BELOW AND YOUR NAME WILL BE PUT INTO A HAT.  If you share this post, let me know and I will add your name again. One name will be chosen at random and announced at the end of the month.

Roseanne Kurstedt Presents:KARATE KID + A Chance to Win a Copy.

Today it is my pleasure to host my friend and fellow Children’s Book Author ROSEANNE KURSTEDT who will share some things about her awesome picture book KARATE KID.

Karate Kid Cover High Resolution

Two Favorite Experiences through the Process

I have two favorite experiences. The first occurred during the creation of the story. As I was doing research, I wanted guidance from a senesi.  The master I trained with had moved away. I took Tae Kwon Do anyway so not sure how helpful that would have been since this book is about karate­, so I needed to find a Karate sensei. I reached out to a sensei at a local dojo and after briefly speaking on the phone, he agreed to meet. He was very helpful in validating and clarifying the information for me. He was so open and willing to help. He also agreed to host the New Jersey book launch for Karate Kid. He could not have been more kind and I am grateful to have connected with him.

My other favorite experience was meeting James and his family. He is the star in all the video promotions. He even ventured into the city to do a Karate demonstration during my New York City book launch. Meeting him and his family was certainly a highlight. His willingness to take risks and try new things is inspiring. He embodies many tenets of Karate.

Copy of Day 30.Quote 5-2 copy

Three Things About Karate Kid

1. Karate has helped Karate Kid have confidence to try new things–even outside of the Dojo. 2. His favorite move is not in the book. It’s a tornado kick.  3. It took him a long time to learn his first Kata.

When writing the book, I tried to have the tone and flow of the words parallel the tenets of each move, and karate in general.  When I read the following comment in the ALA Booklist review, I was thrilled. “…the books entertaining but accurate content, and the smooth written text incorporates the mental component of the sport.” Booklist @ALA_Booklist

Book Giveaway

Join the #IAmAKarateKid campaign—kids and adults can send pictures or words describing how they are a Karate Kid—someone with confidence and focus—someone who embodies the discipline and respect which is at the heart of karate.

So, if you are, or know of someone who is a Karate Kid, tweet, post to Instagram, or to my author Facebook page.  Remember to use #KarateConfidence and #IAmAKarateKid.  One person will receive a signed book and some awesome swag.

Rosanne L. Kurstedt, Ph.D. has been an educator for over 20 years. She’s been an elementary school teacher, staff developer, administrator, adjunct professor, literacy coach, curriculum writer, and most importantly an advocate for children and teachers. She is a co-author of Teaching Writing with Picture Books as Models (Scholastic, 2000) and author of the 100+ Growth Mindset Comments series (Newmark Learning, 2019) for grades K-6. She is currently the Associate Director of READ East Harlem/Hunter College and is so excited about the launch of her new picture book KARATE KID (Running Press Kids)—on sale September 3, 2019.

Finally, she is the founder and president of The Author Experience, a 501(c)(3) organization committed to the transformative power of sharing stories. In collaboration with students, families and educators, The Author Experience provides sustainable experiences that build a culture of literacy—one that elevates connections and delivers lasting impact. Please check us out at www.theauthorexperience.org and become a part of the story! IMG_9645Rosanne can be found on Twitter and Instagram @rlkurstedt and on Facebook @rlkurstedtauthor.

 

Book Give-away: ALL COLORS by Amalia Hoffman

Over the next few weeks I will be giving away copies of children’s books – in honor of Picture Book Month and in time for holiday gifting. I have been lucky enough to receive several copies of these books for free to read and post a review. It’s a wonderful way to get to know new authors. Here is the first book for the give-away. If you’d like to be considered for one of TWO COPIES of the book, leave a comment stating your favorite color and why you like it. Names will be thrown in a hat and two winners randomly drawn and announced in a few weeks.
Here is my review for ALL COLORS  by Amalia Hoffmancover
A board book of color, texture, and vitality that will have the youngest readers captivated. Teaches the simple but important lesson that friendship and love come in all colors.

17th Annual Collingswood Book Festival…Another Great Year!

On Saturday, October 5, 2019, I had the pleasure of attending the COLLINGSWOOD BOOK FESTIVAL, in downtown Collingswood, NJ.   http://www.collingswoodbookfestival.com/

It’s the festival’s 17th year and I am proud to have been a presenting author for the fifth year. There was a lot of excitement and enthusiasm for all things to do with reading and books. And, each year, I get to talk about books and hang out with fellow authors from all over NJ and beyond. The organizers and volunteers behind the scenes always make members of the KidLIt Authors Club feel welcome.  http://www.kidlitauthorsclub.com

Here are some of this year’s highlights in photos:

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PB Authors Robin Newman and Jodi Moore. 

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“Twinning” with fellow MG author and Kid Lit Author’s Club member, Charlotte Bennardo.    

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Members of the KidLit Author’s Club: Jeffry Johnston, me, Charlotte Bennardo, David Neilsen, Jennifer Barr, Kell Andrews, Rob in  Newman, (front:) Jodi Moore, Hallee Adelman

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Middle Grade Panel: What Do Middle Grade Readers Want and Need?

 

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YA Author Jeffry W Johnston

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Beth Ferry Presents: Crows and Scarecrows.

Fall is the perfect time to think about crows and scarecrows. And today’s post is brought to you by best-selling picture book author BETH FERRY. Her latest book, THE SCARECROW, illustrated by the Fan Brothers, is just released.

Scarecrow cover

Here’s Beth:

Crows and ravens are not the same bird, but they are commonly confused. Ravens are larger, shinier, and are more likely to be found in wilder landscapes, whereas crows are smaller and more often found in urban landscapes. Crows make the well-known “caw-caw” call, while ravens make a sound like a “croooak” or a “gronk-gronk”. This will help you see the difference.

crow vs raven

Crows are considered to be one of the most intelligent birds alive. They have the biggest brain-to-body ratio among all the birds. In 2004, it was determined that they are more intelligent than the Bonobo chimpanzee, which makes them the most intelligent creature after humans. Some scientists call them “feathered apes”. They can communicate, use tools and have great memories.

In Japan, carrion crows use cars to help them crack walnuts. Because they have learned to understand how traffic lights work, they will place a walnut in the road when the light is red and wait for a car to smash it. Then they will swoop down and eat the nut. See it here:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvTgRmguSq8

There are two species of crows that have been seen using tools and even making hooks to forage for food.

Crows also have great memories and can even hold a grudge. The University of Washington conducted a study using masks and the crows were able to associate certain behavior with the faces on the masks, remembering who annoyed them and scolding and dive-bombing the people wearing those same masks five years later. You can read more about it here: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/uw-professor-learns-crows-dont-forget-a-face/

Like other intelligent creatures, crows are very social and usually live in pairs and mate for life. They are considered the most family-oriented bird in the world.

And it’s impossible to think about crows without thinking about scarecrows.

The word scarecrow is an aptronym. An aptronym is when a name matches the job of its owner and literally means “an apt name”.

The word scarecrow was first used in literature in 1719 in Robinson Crusoe although scarecrows have been around for much longer.

Scarecrows have existed approximately 3,000 years, designed to do exactly what their name suggests – scare crows. They were first used by the Egyptians to protect their wheat fields along the Nile River from flocks of quail. In 2,500 B.C., Greek farmers carved wooden scarecrows to look like Priapus, the son of the gods, Dionysus and Aphrodite. He was supposedly ugly enough to scare birds away from the vineyards to ensure a good harvest. At the same time, Japanese farmers made scarecrows called Kakashis, to protect their rice fields. They dressed them in rain coats and round straw hats, but added bows and arrows to make them look more threatening. In Germany, scarecrows were made out of wood and made to look like witches. They were supposed to hasten the coming of spring. In Medieval Britain, young children were used as live scarecrows or “bird scarers” and would patrol fields of crops, waving their arms or throwing stones at the birds to scare them away.

But, as you’ve just read, crows are so smart that scarecrows are basically ineffective and today used mainly as decorations. The 21st century has seen new scarecrow-like inventions, including the California Scarecrow (see below) which is a solar-powered, mechanical device that has 17-foot arms that wave and twirl and flap mylar strips. It is not quite as picturesque as a real scarecrow.

electronic crow

But although scarecrows are no longer effective at scaring crows, they have become a beloved part of the culture and celebrated during autumn as decorations and during Scarecrow and Fall Festivals.

Lastly, here is a beautiful poem by Robert Frost that highlights the lovely crow.

crow poem

Would you like to win a Scarecrow Pin?    Leave a comment and Darlene will enter your name in the give-away and choose one lucky winner at random from those entered.scarecrow

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Beth Ferry is the author of numerous books for young readers, including Stick and Stone, Ten Rules of the Birthday Wish and The Scarecrow. She is inspired by two main things: word play and the sea. Luckily, Beth is an avid reader who lives close to the beach so inspiration is never far away. In addition to picture books, Beth has begun writing graphic novels. When not writing, Beth can be found playing with her bulldog, Chaucer.