Writer’s Tip From Literary Rambles

This post was sent to me via the website Literary Rambles. You can find the link for it on the blog roll.

Posted: 21 Feb 2012 07:21 AM PST

Tip Tuesday features writers’ tips on craft, research, querying, blogging, marketing, inspiration, and more. If you’d like to send in a tip, please e-mail me at agentspotlight(at)gmail(dot)com.

I have another fantastic tip from Ryann Kerekes today. I posted one from her a couple weeks ago (Tip #116) and she also sent in Tip #101. Ryann blogs at Novel Addiction where she last posted on what makes a writer succeed. While poking around her blog, I also noticed she’s now represented. Congrats, Ryann!! After you read her tip below, hop over and check out her latest posts.

How to Plot – free writing course!

Can’t afford to attend a conference? Check out the free video tutorial series, How to Plot a Novel, Screenplay or Memoir by the Plot Whisperer, Martha Alderson.

I watched all 27 videos (they’re short, around 6-8 minutes each) and highly recommend them.

A few things I’m working on this week:

– Defining my characters and their short term and long term goals.

– Giving my character a flaw that’s going to work against them achieving their goals.

~Ryann Kerekes

FREE INSPIRATION

Last week I visited the Art Museum on the Princeton University campus. It was great for three reasons. First of all, it’s free. There aren’t many places of culture and enlightenment nowadays that can boast that. And, the collection has something for everyone.  There are sculptures and pottery over 4,000 years old, paintings done by ANDY WARHOL, and everything in between.

The third reason it was a great visit is because where else but an art museum provides peace, quiet, and contemplation along with some magnificent objects of beauty? Being in such an environment frees the mind and allows all sorts of creative energy to enter. Writers who are struggling with writer’s block might find all sorts of inspiration looking at any painting or sculpture, and stories begin to spring into mind. WHY did the artist choose such a subject? WHAT IF the subject were alive today? WHAT would she/he have to say?  The possibilities for story are endless.

So, if you feel as if you’re in a rut and need some change to jump start the muse, visit the Princeton University Art Museum – or ANY art museum and let your imagination run wild. Take notes, snap photos and just doodle in a notebook. You never know, it may be the start of something wonderful. artmuseum.princeton.edu