Mincemeat Enjoys a Storied Past, by Marilyn Ostermiller.

“Would you like a mincemeat cookie?”

When I offer holiday guests a platter of fresh baked mincemeat cookies, I’ve come to expect one of two responses, happy or sorta queasy.

It’s understandable. Minced meat and cookies aren’t a famous pairing, like peanut butter and jelly, or cheese and crackers.

 

Mincemeat can be traced back to Medieval Times in Europe. Back then, it was a way to preserve food without refrigeration. Finely chopped lamb was mixed with dried fruits, sugar and vinegar to keep it from spoiling.

 

A tradition evolved that tied mincemeat pie to Christmas. The pie crust was rectangular, like the manger in Bethlehem. It was filled with mincemeat and a small replica of baby Jesus rested on the filling. A sprinkling of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg symbolized the gifts of the Magi. 

 

Over the years, the meat — finely chopped beef became popular — gradually began to be supplanted with preserved fruits, and sweeteners.

Crosse & Blackwell Rum & Brady Mincemeat Filling & Topping ~ 1 count ~ 29 oz jar

Today’s mincemeat is made mostly from preserved fruits. The brand I prefer doesn’t have a trace of meat or suet. Instead, it’s made with apples, raisins, and orange peel, mixed with corn syrup, vinegar, cornstarch, spices and salt. Some other brands still include beef and suet. Some are spiked with brandy or rum.

While I take the shortcut of prepared mincemeat, two of the cookbooks that will guide more adventurous cooks through the steps to make theirs from scratch include:

  • The Forgotten Arts: Making Old-Fashioned Pickles, Relishes, Chutneys, Sauces and Catsups, Mincemeats, Beverages and Syrups (Yesterday’s Skills Adapted to keywords=Mincemeat+recipes&qid=1571846370&s=books&sr=1-1
  • Preserve & Pickle Recipes (Preserve & Pickle Recipes : With these Fruit Cheeses, Curds, Mincemeat, Conserves, Chutneys And Relishes Book 2) Written by Ana Bridge.

Like pumpkin pie and fruit cake, mincemeat pies, tarts and cookies have their season. It begins at Thanksgiving and ends at Christmas, although leftovers are fair game until New Year’s Eve.

My family favors this recipe:

mincemeat

Mincemeat Cookies

Ingredients:

1 cup unsalted butter

1 1/2 cups sugar

3 eggs

3 cups unsifted flour

1tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. salt

1 1/3 cups mincemeat (I use Crosse & Blackwell brand)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Cream butter and sugar in a mixer. Add eggs, one at a time. Whisk together dry ingredients. Add gradually to the creamed mixture. Stir in mincemeat. Drop tablespoon-sized rounds of batter on a greased baking sheet. Bake 8-10 minutes. Makes 6 dozen.

Marilyn Ostermiller      Marilyn Ostermiller is a long-time journalist, who enjoys baking for family and friends.

 

 

Roseanne Kurstedt Presents:KARATE KID + A Chance to Win a Copy.

Today it is my pleasure to host my friend and fellow Children’s Book Author ROSEANNE KURSTEDT who will share some things about her awesome picture book KARATE KID.

Karate Kid Cover High Resolution

Two Favorite Experiences through the Process

I have two favorite experiences. The first occurred during the creation of the story. As I was doing research, I wanted guidance from a senesi.  The master I trained with had moved away. I took Tae Kwon Do anyway so not sure how helpful that would have been since this book is about karate­, so I needed to find a Karate sensei. I reached out to a sensei at a local dojo and after briefly speaking on the phone, he agreed to meet. He was very helpful in validating and clarifying the information for me. He was so open and willing to help. He also agreed to host the New Jersey book launch for Karate Kid. He could not have been more kind and I am grateful to have connected with him.

My other favorite experience was meeting James and his family. He is the star in all the video promotions. He even ventured into the city to do a Karate demonstration during my New York City book launch. Meeting him and his family was certainly a highlight. His willingness to take risks and try new things is inspiring. He embodies many tenets of Karate.

Copy of Day 30.Quote 5-2 copy

Three Things About Karate Kid

1. Karate has helped Karate Kid have confidence to try new things–even outside of the Dojo. 2. His favorite move is not in the book. It’s a tornado kick.  3. It took him a long time to learn his first Kata.

When writing the book, I tried to have the tone and flow of the words parallel the tenets of each move, and karate in general.  When I read the following comment in the ALA Booklist review, I was thrilled. “…the books entertaining but accurate content, and the smooth written text incorporates the mental component of the sport.” Booklist @ALA_Booklist

Book Giveaway

Join the #IAmAKarateKid campaign—kids and adults can send pictures or words describing how they are a Karate Kid—someone with confidence and focus—someone who embodies the discipline and respect which is at the heart of karate.

So, if you are, or know of someone who is a Karate Kid, tweet, post to Instagram, or to my author Facebook page.  Remember to use #KarateConfidence and #IAmAKarateKid.  One person will receive a signed book and some awesome swag.

Rosanne L. Kurstedt, Ph.D. has been an educator for over 20 years. She’s been an elementary school teacher, staff developer, administrator, adjunct professor, literacy coach, curriculum writer, and most importantly an advocate for children and teachers. She is a co-author of Teaching Writing with Picture Books as Models (Scholastic, 2000) and author of the 100+ Growth Mindset Comments series (Newmark Learning, 2019) for grades K-6. She is currently the Associate Director of READ East Harlem/Hunter College and is so excited about the launch of her new picture book KARATE KID (Running Press Kids)—on sale September 3, 2019.

Finally, she is the founder and president of The Author Experience, a 501(c)(3) organization committed to the transformative power of sharing stories. In collaboration with students, families and educators, The Author Experience provides sustainable experiences that build a culture of literacy—one that elevates connections and delivers lasting impact. Please check us out at www.theauthorexperience.org and become a part of the story! IMG_9645Rosanne can be found on Twitter and Instagram @rlkurstedt and on Facebook @rlkurstedtauthor.

 

Book Giveaway: CRUSHING THE RED FLOWERS by Jennifer Voigt Kaplan

A new book that is an important addition to the WWII genre.

Writing and Illustrating

BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Germany in 1938 comes alive and will be unforgettable to young readers in this powerful debut novel, Crushing the Red Flowers.”―James Patterson

What if the person you are supposed to hate is the one person who can save you?

Crushing the Red Flowersis the story of how two ordinary boys cope under the extraordinary circumstances of Kristallnacht. Emil Rosen and Friedrich Weber couldn’t have less in common, but in the summer of 1938, they must both deal with the changes steamrolling through Hanover, Germany. Friedrich struggles with a cruel new Jungvolk Hitler Youth leader and n uncle in jail, while Emil does his best to avoid the blistering anti-Semitic fog that’s seeped into every cranny of his life and is threatening his family. As the rules of yesterday no longer make sense, both boys find comfort at a private spot along the Leine River. Friedrich…

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Book Give-away: ALL COLORS by Amalia Hoffman

Over the next few weeks I will be giving away copies of children’s books – in honor of Picture Book Month and in time for holiday gifting. I have been lucky enough to receive several copies of these books for free to read and post a review. It’s a wonderful way to get to know new authors. Here is the first book for the give-away. If you’d like to be considered for one of TWO COPIES of the book, leave a comment stating your favorite color and why you like it. Names will be thrown in a hat and two winners randomly drawn and announced in a few weeks.
Here is my review for ALL COLORS  by Amalia Hoffmancover
A board book of color, texture, and vitality that will have the youngest readers captivated. Teaches the simple but important lesson that friendship and love come in all colors.

Got Food? Give Some to Those in Need.

With the holidays coming up, we often think of the needs of those who might be hungry. It’s wonderful to share our bounty during the holiday season. But people aren’t hungry only in November and December. More than 47 million Americans use food banks for some or all of their meals YEAR ROUND.

Take some time today to donate non-perishables to a local food bank. They also need toiletries, diapers, wipes, and sanitary products. Why not make this WORTHWHILE SERVICE PROJECT part of your monthly family routine and teach your children the value of giving to others.

To find a food bank near you: http://www.feedingamerica.org

food pantry-1

What Did The White Pumpkin Say to the Orange Pumpkin?

It’s pumpkin time again…that once a year phenomenon that turns ordinary people into a frenzy of decorating for autumn. Pumpkins spring up everywhere and in everything we eat. Pumpkin latte, muffins, soup, pies, cakes, cookies, pancakes, even beer. So, in honor of the season here are a few fun facts about this popular fruit.   Pumpkins

All facts are taken from the websites listed below:

http://www.sciencekids.co.nz/sciencefacts/food/pumpkins.html

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/diet-nutrition/a22544/facts-about-pumpkins/

 

  • Pumpkins are usually orange but can sometimes be yellow, white, green or red.

  • The name pumpkin comes from the Greek word ‘pepon’, meaning ‘large melon’.

  • The word “pumpkin” showed up for the first time in the fairy tale Cinderella.

  • Scientifically speaking, pumpkins are a fruit (they contain seeds) but when it comes to cooking, they are often referred to as vegetables.

  • Pumpkins are grown on every continent except Antarctica.

  • They vary in weight but an average sized pumpkin might weigh around 13 pounds (6 kilograms).

  • Giant pumpkins can be grown for competitions, with some weighing over 1000 pounds! (450 kilograms). In 2010, the world record was 1810 pounds! That’s huge!!

  • Pumpkin plants feature both male and female flowers, with bees typically being involved in pollination (the transfer of pollen).

  • Over 1 billion pounds (450 million kgs) of pumpkin are produced in the US every year.

  • 80% of the U.S.’s pumpkin crop is available during October.

  • Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of zinc, magnesium, and Omega-3 fats.
  • Pumpkin pie is a sweet dessert that originates in North America and is traditionally eaten during harvest time and holidays such as Thanksgiving and Christmas.

  • Every single part of a pumpkin is edible.

    Yep, you can eat the skin, leaves, flowers, pulp, seeds, and even the stem!

  • Pumpkins are popular decorations during Halloween. A carved pumpkin illuminated by candles is known as a ‘jack-o-lantern’. The tradition is believed to have come from Ireland, where they used to carve faces into turnips, beet and other root vegetables as part of the Gaelic festival of Samhain.

  • The largest pumpkin pie ever baked weighed 3,699 pounds.

People taste 13 October 2007, the bigges

So…what did the white pumpkin say to the orange pumpkin?

ans: I’m looking a little pale, think I should eat some carrots?

Hey, if you’ve got a better PUMPKIN JOKE, bring it on!